Gaslight digest of discussion for 98-oct-19



Gaslight Digest        Monday, October 19 1998        Volume 01 : Number 008



In this issue:

   Wilkie Collins Articles
   Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation
   Re:  Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation
   Re: Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation
   Re: dueling
   Today in History - Oct. 16
   RE: Today in History - Oct. 16
   RE: Crime and Punishment movie
   readings
   Re: duelling
   Re: duelling
   Chat: Book Reviews Available
   Re:  Today in History - Oct. 16
   Re: Mount Auburn Cemetery
   Re:  Today in History - Oct. 16
   Re: Returned from Vacation
   Re: Mervyn Peake
   Re: Another Return: New Orleans
   Re: readings
   Victorian Crime Conference
   Chat: Joan Hickson dies at 92
   Chat: Laughlin and local ghosts
   Chat: know this movie?
   Oklahoma [Was: Re: Returned from Vacation]
   Re: a ghost story for everyone
   Re: readings
   Re: Mount Auburn Cemetery
   Haunted San Francisco
   Oklahoma [Was: Re: Returned from Vacation]
   Re: Haunted San Francisco
   Re: Haunted San Francisco

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 15 Oct 1998 23:41:31 -0500
From: "Richard L. King" <rking(at)INDIAN.VINU.EDU>
Subject: Wilkie Collins Articles

Here is a site with some unusual looking Wilkie Collins commentary. I'm
not sure what it is about, but it looks interesting:
http://web.ukonline.co.uk/stacy.gillis/abstract.htm

The title of one of them certainly is intriguing: "A Bastard-Masculine
Licence in their Opinions": Wilkie Collins and Socially Deviant Women.
Looks liked an M.A. thesis.

Richard King
rking(at)indian.vinu.edu

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 04:02:24 -0500
From: Brian McMillan <brianbks(at)netins.net>
Subject: Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation

>          While we are discussing great historical sites in the area, I
> shouldn't forget to mention the still gorgeous Cain's Ballroom...."Let me
> off at Archer and I'll walk down to Greenwood". About 5 minutes drive
from
> an old home of the Ma Barker gang and a rather dramatic police shoot out
> with Pretty Boy Floyd (old friend of my mother's family, along with Ned
> Christie).
>
>                                James
> James Michael Rogers
> jetan(at)ionet.net
> Mundus Vult Decipi

Hello everyone in Gaslight Land,
  Iowa is also part of Tornado Alley (hoorah..); in fact, one touched down
just last night about 20-30 miles away (didn't cause any damage,
apparently). My dad knows some people who hid in their basement from a
tornado a few years ago & when it had passed they discovered much to their
surprise that the house
was blown away and that they were looking at the sky, a truck had been
placed neatly behind them in the basement & somebodies car outside (that
was ok structurally) got its paint removed
entirely-all this without anyone hearing anything (due to the force of the
vacuum).
  I've been through the panhandle of OK but didn't stop anywhere special-I
was amazed at the amount of rusting material along the way-makes one wonder
about our foreign dependence on oil. I have somewhere an Oklahoma newspaper
from the 1920's filled with
stories of period interest-a little late for gas-lighters but interesting
none-the-less. Mostly oil company reports, but if I remember right there
was something about a lost gold cache, hidden eons ago by Spanish explorers
or some such. Maybe I can make the Gaslighter's rich! :{)
Brian
 Who's Grampa B. said that Jesse James once rode by here (I'm in NE Iowa;
is this likely? Would the gang have been on their way to Northfield?)

brianbks(at)netins.net

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 09:54:21 -0400 (EDT)
From: Zozie(at)aol.com
Subject: Re:  Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation

In a message dated 10/16/98 1:12:41 PM, you wrote:

<<Iowa is also part of Tornado Alley>>

Well -- so is Ayer, Massachusetts, of all places.  About fifteen years ago,
one came skipping into town, took out an apple tree in the front yard, jumped
the house, took out ONE of two matching junipers on either side of a porch on
the back lawn, then bounced over the house and left.

A kind of a tree-trimming tornado, we guessed.

best
phoebe

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 21:46:07 -0500
From: Brian McMillan <brianbks(at)netins.net>
Subject: Re: Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation

Strange. I read a book not long ago called MYSTERIES OF THE UNEXPLAINED
that noted that sometime back in the 1800's a farmer in Kentucky got
visited by a "superheated whirlwind" which set fire to a number of tress,
singed the tails off several horses, set the farmer's house onfire &
continued onwards, gaining in momentum till it came to a river, wherein it
turned downstream, sent up a cloud of steam & eventually fizzled out. Maybe
this was what inspired the original "pillar of fire" in the bible?
Brian
- ----------
> From: Zozie(at)aol.com
> To: gaslight(at)MtRoyal.AB.CA
> Subject: Re:  Re: CHAT: RE: Returned from Vacation
> Date: Friday, October 16, 1998 8:54 AM
>
>
> In a message dated 10/16/98 1:12:41 PM, you wrote:
>
> <<Iowa is also part of Tornado Alley>>
>
> Well -- so is Ayer, Massachusetts, of all places.  About fifteen years
ago,
> one came skipping into town, took out an apple tree in the front yard,
jumped
> the house, took out ONE of two matching junipers on either side of a
porch on
> the back lawn, then bounced over the house and left.
>
> A kind of a tree-trimming tornado, we guessed.
>
> best
> phoebe

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 08:28:51 -0700 (PDT)
From: "linda j. holland-toll" <ljht(at)SCS.UNR.EDU>
Subject: Re: dueling

On Sat, 3 Oct 1998 Zozie(at)aol.com wrote:

> Greetings all...
>
> Ron wrote that dueling was illegal after 1888.  I thought it was earlier, but
> I guess I am thinking about its becoming unfashionable.  A little out of our
> time frame, but I'm thinking about the swirl of trend-setting at Bath in the
> latter days of the 18th century, when Beau Nashe decreed that dueling was not
> a manly sport.  Remembering that Sheridan fought some duels and even was
> horribly wounded in one.  My recollection is that the combatants fled to
> France.  I thought it was because they would be arrested.
>
> Is my memory failing here?  Anyone remember this?
>
> best
> phoebe
>
 that is what i thought - fleeing for the continent was not
unusual, especially if the duel was successful and someone got killed, but
anne perry, in -highgate road- has Pitt unable to arrest two duelists
becasue neither will charge the other with assault and he doesn' think
disturbing the queen's peace will hold up. i know perry is pretty good on
her history, overall, and so i thought Pitt could arrest them both. if ron
is right, though, why doesn't he arrst them. -highgate road takes place in
1888, so i wonder....linda

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 11:43:31 -0600
From: Jerry Carlson <gmc(at)libra.pvh.org>
Subject: Today in History - Oct. 16

            1846
                Ether was first administered in public at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital in Boston by
                Dr. William Thomas Green Morton during an operation performed 
by Dr. John Collins
                Warren.
            1859
                Abolitionist John Brown, with 21 men, seizes the U.S. Armory at 
Harpers Ferry, Va. U.S.
                Marines capture the raiders, killing several. John Brown is 
later hanged in Virginia for
                treason.
            1901
                President Theodore Roosevelt incites controversy by inviting 
black leader Booker T.
                Washington to the White House.
            1908
                The first airplane flight in England is made at Farnsborough, 
by Samuel Cody, a U.S.
                citizen.

      Born on October 16
            1758
                Noah Webster, U.S. teacher and publisher who wrote the American 
Dictionary of the
                English Language
            1797
                Lord Cardigan, leader of the famed Light Brigade which was 
decimated in the Crimean
                War, who eventually had a jacket named after him
            1854
                Oscar Wilde, dramatist, poet, novelist and critic.

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 14:14:30 -0400
From: "Marcella, Michelle E" <MMARCELLA(at)PARTNERS.ORG>
Subject: RE: Today in History - Oct. 16

MGH still celebrates this as employee recognition day.  Interesting
history to this:  much controversy over who "discovered" ether.  Morton
credited since his was the first successful demonstration.  Patient
Gilbert Abbott had a vascular jaw tumor removed while under sedation.
After operation was completed and Abbott insisted he had felt no pain,
Warren turned the assembled audience and declared:  "Gentleman, this is
no humbug."  If anyone is interested, I have an eight-page publication
that was produced for the 150th anniversary of the celebration in '96.

Michelle Marcella
Public Affairs Office
Mass. General Hospital

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jerry Carlson [SMTP:gmc(at)libra.pvh.org]
> Sent: Friday, October 16, 1998 1:44 PM
> To: gaslight(at)MtRoyal.AB.CA
> Subject: Today in History - Oct. 16
>
>             1846
>                 Ether was first administered in public at the
> Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston by
>                 Dr. William Thomas Green Morton during an operation
> performed by Dr. John Collins
>                 Warren.
>

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 19:28:45 -0400
From: "James D. Hake" <jdh(at)apk.net>
Subject: RE: Crime and Punishment movie

At 09:54 PM 10/11/98 -0400, you wrote:
>If you liked the movie, why not visit the setting in person? For your
>reading pleasure during commercials, here's something from the Frommer's
>website:
>
>The Economist, the famous British magazine, got their "Intelligence Unit" to
>work figuring out the cost of living in cities around the world, with prices
>measured against those of New York City (already high enough!). On the list
>of 120 cities, Budapest came in 116th, making it the cheapest in Europe, the
>magazine says.

Personal experience says if you want to spend a lot of money on a meal you
can. And as I recall the hotel wasn't cheap either ;-)

BUT it is a beautiful city and I highly recommend a visit if anyone is
considering it.


Regards,


Jim
jdh(at)apk.net      ICQ 13319161
Online superstore at http://www.vibc.com/ImpactIntl.html


A Thousand Roads to Mecca - Ten Centuries of Traveler's
Writing about the Muslim Pilgrimage (Library) (338)
Sixteen Short Novels [ ] (259)
Rhetoric/Poetics - Aristotle (60)
All for the Union - the Civil War Diary and Letters of
Elisha Hunt Rhodes (14)
Earth Song, Sky Spirit, Edited by Clifford Trafzer (385)
Patriots by ??, (100)
Vampires - The Greatest Stories, Ed. by Martin H. Greenberg (42)


On Deck




Recent Acquisitions
Ya-Ya
Flanders Panel

Note -- Most books removed from the list available for barter/trade/sale

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 22:15:23 -0500
From: Deborah Mattingly Conner <muse(at)iland.net>
Subject: readings

She looks at her shoe, and asks with embarrassment: what story are we on?
(She was having a strange daydream about tornadoes...)

With heart,
Deborah Mattingly Conner
muse(at)iland.net
http://www.iland.net/~muse
"Love is the burning point of life, and since all life is sorrowful, so is
love.  The stronger the love, the more the pain." ~Joseph Campbell  The
Power of Myth

 -

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 23:34:14 -0600 (MDT)
From: "p.h.wood" <woodph(at)freenet.edmonton.ab.ca>
Subject: Re: duelling

A case in point; I cite from Cecil Woodham-Smith's "The Reason Why", which
discusses the Charge of the Light Brigade, and the how and why of the
whole affair. In 1840 one Captain Harvey Tuckett had insulted Lord
Cardigan by publishing a letter which attacked him in the strongest terms
as having "grossly and wantonly insulted officers at the mess table, and
when called to account had pleaded his privilege as a commanding officer
to avoid a duel".
Number 60 of the British Army's Articles of War laid it down that to
challenge another officer to a duel was a cashiering offence upon
conviction. However, Tuckett had recently left the service, and Cardigan
could, and did, challenge him without breaking Army regulations. At 5
p.m. on September 12 they met at the windmill on Wimbledon Common. Shots
were exchanged and Tuckett was wounded.
The miller (a civilian), arrested all those involved and took them to
Wandsworth police station, where they were charged to appear at the Old
Bailey on October 20th. Here a grand jury found the Earl of Cardigan and
his second  fit to be charged with intent to murder, maim, and cause
bodily harm to Captain Tuckett. The Earl, as a Peer of the Realm, was to
appear before the House of Lords on February 16 1841.
Duelling had been illegal under Lord Lansdowne's Act since 1828, carrying
the death penalty; in 1837 this was modified to apply only if injury or
death resulted, otherwise the penalty was three years' hard labour or
transportation for fifteen years.
The Earl of Cardigan was acquitted on a technicality by a unanimous vote
of his peers - the prosecution failed to show that the victim named in the
charge and the man found wounded on Wimbledon Common were one and the
same person.
For further details of this typical episode in the life of a Victorian
peer - it would be, I feel, an oxymoron to describe him as a gentleman - I
refer those interested to Cecil Woodham-Smith's excellent book.
Peter Wood

===0===



Date: Sat, 17 Oct 1998 02:54:47 -0500
From: Robert Raven <rraven(at)alaska.net>
Subject: Re: duelling

Peter,

Glad to see you recommend this book.  I concur.  For those of you
unfamiliar with it, I can only recommend it most highly.  It's one of
the best and most accessible popular histories I've ever read.

Bob Raven

===0===



Date: Sat, 17 Oct 1998 11:46:33 -0400
From: "James E. Kearman" <jkearman(at)javanet.com>
Subject: Chat: Book Reviews Available

Two book reviews appearing recently in The Scotsman Online  may interest
Gaslight readers. The first is a review of a history of WW1 by John Keegan.
The second is a review of the second volume of a biography of Coleridge, by
Richard Holmes.

You can read these reviews online by navigating to the site
(http://www.scotsman.com/) or request them via email from me. To receive
both reviews, send me email with '1017A' in the Subject line. A copy will be
sent automatically in reply. (I don't read these.)

Here are excerpts from the reviews:

The First World War
By John Keegan
Hutchinson, ?25

Reviewed by Sir Julian Critchley

JOHN Keegan and Andrew Roberts are probably today the best writers of the
Great War, Keegan on the political and military side: Roberts rivalling
Marder, on the war at sea. I took Keegan's book with me to Brittany, where
it handsomely filled the time between seafood and oversauced fish. I found
it magisterial in its scope, beautifully written, and (how often is the
phrase used when you do not really mean it?), literally unputdownable.
The Great War was an accidental war, fuelled by the vanity of Conrad Von
Hotzendorf, the Austria/Hungarian commander-in-chief, and triggered by a
gang of murderous Croats. The assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand set in
train a sequence of events which even the Tsar and the Kaiser were powerless
to prevent. At the time of the Cold War, nuclear strategists feared war by
accident as the most likely way in which the world would end in
conflagration. In 1914, the remorseless need to mobilise in time, and by so
doing deny the advantage to the rival powers, brought war to Europe by a
thousand trains.

Exploits of a holy opium addict

The second half of a great poet's story is fascinating fare, despite the
decline that dogged Coleridge's later life, writes Robert Nye

Reflections on Coleridge
By Richard Holmes
HarperCollins, ?19.99

ON an April morning in 1804, a man with the look of a dolphin set sail for
the Mediterranean wearing four waistcoats and two pairs of flannel drawers
under cloth pantaloons. He looked like a dolphin because he could not
breathe properly through his nose, with the consequence that his mouth
always hung slightly open. He was fat, 31, and addicted to opium. His name
was Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
The second and concluding volume of Richard Holmes's life of Coleridge
begins at this point, and very dramatically and well he begins it, making
the most of a rare moment of decisive action in an existence that was
otherwise pure dithering.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
James E. Kearman
mailto:jkearman(at)javanet.com
http://www.javanet.com/~jkearman

Why do you wander further and further?
Look! All good is here.
Only learn to seize your joy,
For joy is always near.?? --Goethe

===0===



Date: Fri, 16 Oct 1998 18:15:42 -0400 (EDT)
From: Zozie(at)aol.com
Subject: Re:  Today in History - Oct. 16

In a message dated 10/16/98 5:49:23 PM, you wrote:

<<1846 Ether was first administered in public at the Massachusetts General
Hospital in Boston by Dr. William Thomas Green Morton during an operation
performed by Dr. John Collins Warren. >>

For you vacationers -- Dr Morton's grave marker (a lengthy one) is right by
the tower in Mount Auburn Cementery in Cambridge, MA.  And just above the
soaring Cleo's needle that marks the bones of Charlotte Cushman, the great
19th C American actress.

Mount Auburn is a very special place.  An arboretum as well, and one of the
great spring bird-watching sites in New England -- with the flowering trees
and bushes, the periwinkles, the soft snoozing of Mary Baker Eddy and
Longfellow and Bucky Fuller and Winslow Homer and Edwin Booth, et al, it is
lovely to wander around looking for the return wahblas (warblers to you non-
Bostonians)...

best
phoebe

===0===



Date: Sat, 17 Oct 1998 19:52:34 -0600 (MDT)
From: "p.h.wood" <woodph(at)freenet.edmonton.ab.ca>
Subject: Re: Mount Auburn Cemetery

For a different approach to this spot, I recommend reading H.P.
Lovecraft's story "Pickman's Model", where Mount Auburn Cemetery is also
mentioned...
Peter Wood

===0===



Date: Sat, 17 Oct 1998 20:57:36 -0500 (CDT)
From: James Rogers <jetan(at)ionet.net>
Subject: Re:  Today in History - Oct. 16

At 06:15 PM 10/16/98 -0400,Phubby wrote:
>
>Mount Auburn is a very special place.  An arboretum as well, and one of the
>great spring bird-watching sites in New England -- with the flowering trees
>and bushes, the periwinkles, the soft snoozing of Mary Baker Eddy and
>Longfellow and Bucky Fuller and Winslow Homer and Edwin Booth, et al, it is
>lovely to wander around looking for the return wahblas (warblers to you non-
>Bostonians)...
>
>best
>phoebe
>

       Lovecraft has already told us that them folks is all dug up
("Pickman's Model").

                               James

James Michael Rogers
jetan(at)ionet.net
Mundus Vult Decipi

===0===



Date: Sun, 18 Oct 1998 21:45:43 -0400
From: "Kevin J. Clement" <clementk(at)alink.com>
Subject: Re: Returned from Vacation

Patricia Teter wrote:

> Western/Frontier dating to the late 1860s - early 1870s when Custer and
> Sheridan were in OK territory.  This gathering was so small there was not
> much chance of running each other over, however, several riders were
> rather expert.  The canon was the best, since firing and loading were 
explained
> and demonstrated.  My uncle from Louisville, KY highly recommends the
> reenactment of the battle of Perryville, KY with thousands on horseback.
> Have you seen this?
>
> best regards,
> Patricia
>
> Patricia A. Teter
> PTeter(at)Getty.edu

 I've not been down to KY in a while but it sounds like a good reason to go. A
cousin of mine currently in reenacting may have been there though. Glad to
hear there were several expert riders, a good rider treats the horse much
better and is IMO much more worth watching. (don't know how to ride yet but
respect those who do) I've not really been to a large battle reenactment but
enjoy skirmishes.

 There's a small battle/camp reenactment (100-200 a side?) every summer in a
county park about 3-5 miles from where I live and this year they put more
permanent sites up and had tours disguised as soldiers escorting civilians
back to their homes. Allowed visitors to see more up close and learn a bit
more about the life of a soldier, weapons, causes, etc. At one point the
escorts stop near canon crews who go through the whole drill under fire.
 Much better for newcomers than just watching a battle with no explanation of
the action, though there used to be more civilian renactors, which I miss.
Always nice to have more than just soldiers and I enjoyed having a band strike
up before and during the battle haggling the crowd & the soldiers.

 That ties into why I've been going to the Ohio Renaissance Festival more than
local ACW; the RenFest is more entertaining. I've also been overexposed to
ACW; hence my current interest in Napoleon III and the various Victorian Era
Wars. Glad to hear of people living other parts of history more than just the
major eastern ACW battles.

Kevin Clement
clementk(at)alink.com

===0===



Date: Sun, 18 Oct 1998 22:14:52 -0400
From: "Kevin J. Clement" <clementk(at)alink.com>
Subject: Re: Mervyn Peake

Ginger Johnson wrote:
>
> The Ballantine editions published in the early 70s do have Peake's
> illustrations - wonderful things.  He also illustrated Treasure Island in
> a frightening manner.
>
> Ginger Johnson
>
> "An oyster may be crossed in love."
>                             - Sheridan

 Comparing the Ballantines (assume this means the paperbacks) to the newer
tpbs by Tusk, it seems like the 70's paperbacks cut out several illustrations
and rearranged the order. Granted I don't have access to any older copies of
the books but the illustrations in the newer editions tend to match
characters/actions/scenes better and also include covers and endpieces by
Peake, which greatly add to the look of the book.

 Reasons why I chose Lord_Sepulchrave for my yahoo handle - when I signed up
for the account to handle extra email I was running out of names that hadn't
already been taken and didn't want kkkeving2890(at)yahoo.com as my email address.
The Gormenghast books happened to be on a shelf to my right...thinking that
since I seem to be the only one who knows about Peake (ahh the wasteland that
is central Ohio :P ) that I know, the odds that someone's taken a name from
the books for email would be next to nil.
 That's one more reason why I like this list; having discussions about authors
like Peake who either I don't know much or anything about or who I had the
hardest time finding anything about. (and such great people on the list!)

Kevin Clement

(who just watched Shelly's Frankenstein yesterday and thought it wasn't *that*
bad until 3/4's of the way through but who still enjoys the book far more;
*too* many stitches IMO and did they have to use that much embryonic fluid?)

clementk(at)alink.com

===0===



Date: Sun, 18 Oct 1998 22:33:03 -0400
From: "Kevin J. Clement" <clementk(at)alink.com>
Subject: Re: Another Return: New Orleans

JDS Books wrote:
>
> Deborah,
>     Speaking of Mississippi ghosts, I presume you are familiar with
> Clarence John Laughlin's haunting _Ghosts Along the Mississippi_
> (1948)?  A truly marvelous book of photographs, with commentary.
>     Kevin Clement may be interested to hear that Laughlin was another Shiel
> fan.
 Thanks for the info, sounds like another book to look up.

>     I only got one further letter from Laughlin.  Did he ever finish the New
> Orleans
> book?  Does anyone know?
 Ghosts seems to be out of print (according to Amazon, not the best source I
admit) but there is a book called Haunter of Ruins with photographs by him on
New Orleans at Amazon that came out about a year ago.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0821223615/qid=908763876/sr=1-1/002-02343
04-9000643

looks like this may the book your're thinking about. Guess I'll have to check
up on some of the local Ohio ghost books. BTW, Granville has at least two
haunted inns, Granville Inn & Buxton Inn. Buxton has far more ghosts (at least
4) and more publicity. Sorry to say I've not seen any.

>     Still muttering to myself,
>     in Shadow haunted Kettering, OH
>
>     John Squires

Kevin Clement

in way too lit up but we still won't allow Neon signs Granville, OH
(glad I live out of the village and can actually see the sky, storms, and 
shadows...)

===0===



Date: Sun, 18 Oct 1998 21:58:39 -0700
From: John Elliott <john(at)AT-FIRST-SITE.COM>
Subject: Re: readings

I, too, have to wonder what stories we are reading now.

I have been away for some tme, and have eagerly looked on the next few
months with anticipation as I have set them aside to read gaslight-era
stories and hopefully get involved in the discussions, but I cannot find a
"current list" that goes beyond "1998-July: Fourth annual all-Canadian
month."

I linked to the "Current Reading List" from the Gaslight Home Page. Am I
missing something?

John Elliott
Albany, Oregon, USA
http://at-first-site.com/ (web site)
john(at)at-first-site.com (use this for all normal email)

http://at-first-site.com/mdw/ (Maurine Watkins web site)
mdw(at)at-first-site.com (for all email relating to Maurine Watkins)
- -----Original Message-----
From: Deborah Mattingly Conner <muse(at)iland.net>
To: gaslight(at)MtRoyal.AB.CA <gaslight(at)MtRoyal.AB.CA>
Date: Friday, October 16, 1998 8:11 PM
Subject: readings


>She looks at her shoe, and asks with embarrassment: what story are we on?
>(She was having a strange daydream about tornadoes...)
>
>With heart,
>Deborah Mattingly Conner
>muse(at)iland.net
>http://www.iland.net/~muse
>"Love is the burning point of life, and since all life is sorrowful, so is
>love.  The stronger the love, the more the pain." ~Joseph Campbell  The
>Power of Myth
>
> -
>
>

===0===



Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 13:44:05 -0400 (EDT)
From: Chris Willis <c.willis(at)english.bbk.ac.uk>
Subject: Victorian Crime Conference

(Apologies for cross-posting)

VICTORIAN CRIME

UNIVERSITY OF LONDON CENTRE FOR ENGLISH STUDIES
SATURDAY 24 APRIL 1999

The aim of this one-day interdisciplinary conference is to explore the
relationship between crime and nineteenth century society.

COST:
?18 (concessions ?10)  Cheques payable to "The University of London"

BOOKINGS AND ENQUIRIES:
Centre for English Studies, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
tel: 0171 862 8675
fax: 0171 862 8672
e-mail: ces(at)sas.ac.uk

CALL FOR PAPERS:

Possible themes could include:

crime fiction
the birth of forensic science
police history
crime journalism
slums and rookeries
Jack the Ripper
Mayhew and other social observers
frauds and fakes
political unrest
prostitution
prisons and punishment
legal history
crime, gender and sexuality

Proposals for 20-minute papers (not more than 250 words) should be sent
by 15 December 1998 to:

Chris Willis
Department of English
Birkbeck College
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

e-mail:  100415.1234(at)compuserve.com OR c.willis(at)english.bbk.ac.uk

===0===



Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:12:02 -0400
From: "James E. Kearman" <jkearman(at)javanet.com>
Subject: Chat: Joan Hickson dies at 92

From the London Times, 19 Oct 98:

Joan Hickson dies at 92

JOAN HICKSON, the actress who found stardom in her seventies as Agatha
Christie's Miss Marple, has died in a Colchester hospital aged 92.

Miss Hickson made her acting debut in 1927, had a long stage career, and
appeared in more than a hundred films. But it will be as the spinster
detective in the BBC television adaptations of the Christie stories that she
will be best remembered.


-----------------------------------------------------------------
James E. Kearman
mailto:jkearman(at)javanet.com
http://www.javanet.com/~jkearman
Why do you wander further and further?
Look! All good is here.
Only learn to seize your joy,
For joy is always near.   --Goethe

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 07:50:32 -0700
From: Deborah McMillion Nering <deborah(at)gloaming.com>
Subject: Chat: Laughlin and local ghosts

Ghosts of The Mississippi is out of print, by Laughlin, but you can find
used copies easily on the used nets like Biblios or Interloc

Haunter of Ruins is kind of a "best of" Laughlin--has some photos of
Mississippi ruins, some of New Orleans cemeteries and even some of San
Francisco...the very recognizable building with the wrought iron railings
and elevator used in both BLADE RUNNER and Outer Limits' "Man with the
glass hand".

>check up on some of the local Ohio ghost books. BTW, Granville has at
>least two
>haunted inns, Granville Inn & Buxton Inn.

One of the best sources of "local" ghost story resources (one I always
check before I travel) is Invisible Ink's listings.  More ghost stories
than you can shake a stake at (oops, wrong cure!).  They are now Online,
but the catalogues are fun.

Deborah




Deborah McMillion
deborah(at)gloaming.com
http://www.gloaming.com/deborah.html

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 08:45:25 -0700
From: Deborah McMillion Nering <deborah(at)gloaming.com>
Subject: Chat: know this movie?

This movie is offered by Invisible Ink, I've never seen or heard about it,
anyone else know?

 Orson Welles' Ghost Story [Return to Glennascaull]

Shot between filming Othello, in angular black and white.  A young man
drives two mysterious ladies/nominated for Academy Award for short subject.

Anyone seen this?
Deborah


Deborah McMillion
deborah(at)gloaming.com
http://www.gloaming.com/deborah.html

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:47:14 -0600
From: sdavies(at)MtRoyal.AB.CA
Subject: Oklahoma [Was: Re: Returned from Vacation]

Is Oklahoma still called the "Sooner" state?
                                  Stephen

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:49:12 -0600
From: athan chilton <ayc(at)UIUC.EDU>
Subject: Re: a ghost story for everyone

 The only comment I would make concerns the
>willow-maiden. It would have been nice to learn more about her tale and
>the circumstances that led to her fate. But then ghosts are mysterious,
>I suppose. BB

Thanks very much, BB (purrs like cat)  Wait'll I find a story in which I
can use some descriptions of where I spent this weekend--Ft. Massac, on the
Ohio River in southern Illinois... imagine the sound of bagpipes, or fife &
drum corp

To learn more about the willow-maiden you will have to read Hearn
himself--I lifted, from one of his tales, the idea of a maiden who
'belongs' to a tree and who dies when her tree is felled.

athan
ayc(at)uiuc.edu

ayc(at)uiuc.edu

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:52:16 -0600
From: sdavies(at)MtRoyal.AB.CA
Subject: Re: readings

John, Deborah, et alia,
     you're not missing something.  It's those of us at Gaslight central
who are missing: coordination, time and clear memory.
     The next reading schedule is planned, but I have the nagging feeling
that I had processed an etext for the last week of October (a ghost story).
I've etexted Reade's "A Knightsbridge mystery" for this week, but can't
find the etext.  (This was done some time ago.  November will be filled by
welcome contributions by Lucy, Toni and Bob B.
                                  Stephen

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 10:03:01 -0600
From: Jerry Carlson <gmc(at)libra.pvh.org>
Subject: Re: Mount Auburn Cemetery

I remember seeing the _Night Gallery_ teleplay of that story, at about the age 
of 10.  Worst willies I've ever had.

Jerry
gmc(at)libra.pvh.org

>>> "p.h.wood" <woodph(at)freenet.edmonton.ab.ca> 10/17 7:52 PM >>>
For a different approach to this spot, I recommend reading H.P.
Lovecraft's story "Pickman's Model", where Mount Auburn Cemetery is also
mentioned...
Peter Wood

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 10:29:05 -0600
From: athan chilton <ayc(at)UIUC.EDU>
Subject: Haunted San Francisco

... some of San
>Francisco...the very recognizable building with the wrought iron railings
>and elevator used in both BLADE RUNNER and Outer Limits' "Man with the
>glass hand".

I don't remember this! What building is it, and where in SF--if anybody
happens to know??

athan (big fan of haunted SF, w/some experience of same!)
ayc(at)uiuc.edu

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:31:12 -0700
From: Patricia Teter <PTeter(at)getty.edu>
Subject: Oklahoma [Was: Re: Returned from Vacation]

Stephen wrote: <<Is Oklahoma still called the "Sooner" state?>>

Indeed it is.

PT

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:35:36 -0700
From: Patricia Teter <PTeter(at)getty.edu>
Subject: Re: Haunted San Francisco

someone wrote: <<.. some of San
>Francisco...the very recognizable building with the wrought iron railings
>and elevator used in both BLADE RUNNER and Outer Limits' "Man with the
>glass hand".

I thought this was the building in downtown LA that has recently been
restored....the Bradbury building, or something like that.

Patricia

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Date: Mon, 19 Oct 1998 09:43:38 -0700
From: Deborah McMillion Nering <deborah(at)gloaming.com>
Subject: Re: Haunted San Francisco

>... some of San
>>Francisco...the very recognizable building with the wrought iron railings
>>and elevator used in both BLADE RUNNER and Outer Limits' "Man with the
>>glass hand".
>
>I don't remember this! What building is it, and where in SF--if anybody
>happens to know??

My apologies, this was in a group of photos from scattered places in Calif,
it is the Bradbury building and it is in Los Angeles.  Designed in 1893 by
George Wyman, it is a five storied brick shell, with a "magnificent central
court, all the office backed up against the walls of the shell, and faced
with superb iron balconies anticipating modern architects and breaking away
from European traditions."  Other innovations in this building were
elevator shafts completely exposed, and far above, the whole top of the
building is glass.

The best photos are in Laughlin's THE PERSONAL EYE, also out of print but
easily available used and in librariers.

Deborah


Deborah McMillion
deborah(at)gloaming.com
http://www.gloaming.com/deborah.html

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End of Gaslight Digest V1 #8
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